Amitabh Bachchan on rapes: Will the Angry Old Man stop prevaricating?

At a promotional event for his film 102 Not Out on Thursday, Amitabh Bachchan was asked about his opinion on the Kathua and Unnao rape cases. His reply: “I feel disgusted even talking about it. So, don’t rake up this issue.” Disgust and outrage have, of course, been the overwhelming reactions to the incidents that have sparked nationwide protests and followed Prime Minister Narendra Modi to London. Bachchan’s reactions are unexceptionable, but one would have expected something more nuanced and responsible from the brand ambassador of the central government’s flagship, Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao Yojana, which has also been lampooned since the incidents came to light.

While it is only natural to feel disgust at the incidents, to shove it under the carpet – as Bachchan has tried to do in this case – is unacceptable for a public figure of his stature. Almost everyone else in Bollywood – Akshay Kumar, Twinkle Khanna, Kalki Koechlin, Rajkumar Rao, Shabana Azmi, Swara Bhaskar – have condemned the incidents in no uncertain terms, demanding justice for the victim and the survivor in the two cases. For Bachchan, the tallest among his peers and colleagues, to keep silent about the incidents, while continuing to helm a government-sponsored programme for empowerment of women, is nothing short of prevarication.

This is especially so because he has been vocal about women’s rights and has played the part of a woke feminist when it has suited him. On September 5, 2016, Bachchan shared a video on his official Twitter handle, on which he read out a letter he had written to his granddaughters, Aaradhya Bachchan and Navya Naveli Nanda. The letter, he said, was not meant for only them, but for all granddaughters. In it, he advises them to “make your own choices in the light of your own wisdom… [and] never worry about log kya kahenge (what people will say).” He also tells them: “Don’t let anyone make you believe that the length of your skirt is a measure of your character.”

However, what Bachchan’s onscreen avatar, reputed lawyer Deepak, professed is perhaps way too far from his real-life persona. Nothing should have prevented him from condemning the incidents, perhaps even symbolically resigning from his position as the brand ambassador of the Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao Yojana. PM Modi has been at the receiving end of brickbats for not speaking out about the rape cases immediately, with the Quint running a satirical piece last Friday with the headline: “Here is what PM Narendra Modi said about the Kathua and Unnao rapes”, while the story read: “This piece will be updated as soon as he says something about it.” (The story, which went viral online, was indeed updated when the PM finally broke his silence.) While we hold our elected representatives responsible, we should also have a similar yardstick for public figures who choose only convenient moments to speak about important issues.

Bachchan has of course been known to only play it safe. Back in the mid-Seventies, when he was closer to the Nehru-Gandhi clan, journalists claimed that he had encouraged then prime minister Indira Gandhi’s government to censor film publications. This, in turn, led them to blacklisting him from their pages for years. Bachchan has categorically denied doing this, but he did not really speak out against the Emergency, say like Kishore Kumar, Dev Anand or Hrishikesh Mukherjee. Silence is, conveniently, golden.