Covid-19 pandemic: Blue-collar roles see 25% surge in urban areas

Social commerce start-up DealShare has hired more than 100 employees in operations in the last 20 days and is planning to hire more than 500 people for operations in the next three months.
While the Covid-19 pandemic has pushed several industries and small businesses into a tight spot and led to a rise in unemployment in the rural sector, it has also led to an increasing demand for blue-collar workers.

Other than the demand for delivery staff, the need for health care services has given rise to supply chain- and logistics-related jobs, researchers, pharmacists, manufacturing workers, and other related roles, observed human resource analysts. With people staying home because of state lockdowns, there has been a 25 per cent rise in demand for delivery staff, health care manufacturing, and data entry roles during the second wave, reveals a TeamLease analysis.

“In the life sciences and health care sector, new drugs are being introduced. Oxygen manufacturing-related skills are in demand - easily over 2.5x. Also, the demand for doctors and nurses has gone up threefold,” said Kaushik Banerjee, vice-president and business head, TeamLease and Freshersworld.

As the second Covid wave continues to wreak havoc, on-demand e-commerce platform Dunzo has said it has seen its ‘application (app)-open’ metric double since the month of March as more users leveraged the app to order and deliver home-cooked meals, medical aid, and other essentials to their loved ones.

Between March and May, its riders delivered over 20,000 orders to hospitals alone.


“We work with over 19,000 partners across eight cities to deliver groceries, medicines, and essentials sourced from local merchants. We are actively onboarding delivery partners in areas of high demand and where there is a requirement. We have partner onboarding teams across cities that have initiated remote onboarding,” said a spokesperson for Dunzo. “In terms of pick-up and drops and e-commerce deliveries, there has been a rise in demand,” said Devangshu Dutta, chief executive officer, Third Eyesight.

E-grocery players, such as Grofers, are seeing consistent increase in demand since February. BigBasket — recently acquired by Tata Group — has even started a token system on its app, assuring customers a slot. “Given the current situation, we are hiring warehouse and delivery staff to address the surge in demand and serve as many households as we can in this hour of need. We have hired over 2,000 people across 30 cities. To build additional capacity, we plan to add over 7,000 more people across our supply chain and last-mile operations. Additionally, we have also hired close to 500 women at our warehouses,” said a Grofers spokesperson.

With online delivery of food allowed in most cities, Zomato and Swiggy are seeing an upsurge in demand, compared to last year, which could translate into more hirings this year.

Social commerce start-up DealShare has hired more than 100 employees in operations in the last 20 days and is planning to hire more than 500 people for operations in the next three months.

“Since we are getting over 55,000 orders per day, the number of inbound calls has also gone up. We have been aggressively hiring customer executives who speak in regional languages in the cities and states we have a presence in,” said Sankar Bora, founder and chief operating officer, DealShare.

While there has been a surge in blue-collar roles in urban areas, the picture is different in rural regions.


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