Facebook may leave Europe if Ireland enforces ban on data sharing with US

Topics Facebook | United States | Europe

According to Facebook's spokesperson, a lack of such safe data transfers would damage the economy and hamper the growth of data-driven businesses within the EU.

Facebook may have to pull out of Europe if the Irish Data Protection Commission enforces a ban on sharing data with the US after the European Court of Justice found that the bloc's measures to protect its data from US intelligence agencies were insufficient, Head of Data Protection and Associate General Counsel at Facebook Ireland Yvonne Cunnane said in a court filing.

In July, the European Court of Justice invalidated the 2016 Privacy Shield, saying that EU digital privacy laws were at risk of being violated under the agreement, which allows for data to be transferred, stored, and processed in the United States.

"In the event that [Facebook] was subject to a complete prohibition on the transfer of user data to the United States, as appears to be what the DPC [Data Protection Commissioner] proposes, it is not clear to [Facebook] how, in such circumstances, it could continue to provide inter alia the Facebook and Instagram services in the EU," the document unveiled earlier this week said.

Facebook subsequently stated that the filing was not a threat but rather a simple reflection of the reality that the company along with other organizations and businesses rely on data transfers between the EU and the US in order to operate their services. According to Facebook's spokesperson, a lack of such safe data transfers would damage the economy and hamper the growth of data-driven businesses within the EU.


(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.

We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

Business Standard is now on Telegram.
For insightful reports and views on business, markets, politics and other issues, subscribe to our official Telegram channel