Peru, Chile set to slug it out in Indian courts over 'Pisco' brandy GI tag

Photo: Wikipedia
South American nations Peru and Chile may end up in Indian courts as both have locked horns in the country over GI (Geographical Indications) tag on 'Pisco' brandy.

A GI tag is primarily an agricultural, natural or a manufactured product (handicrafts and industrial goods) originating from a definite geographical territory.

Typically, such a name conveys an assurance of quality and distinctiveness, which is essentially attributable to the place of its origin.

While Peru has sought GI tag in India for 'Pisco' brandy, Chile opposed the move saying they also sell the same product with same name.

The GI Registry office in India passed an order renaming the GI as "Peruvian Pisco" and issued a certificate of registration.

Against this order, Peru filed an appeal before the Intellectual Property Appellate Board as they want the tag as "Pisco" only.

The Intellectual property appellate board (IPAB) after hearing the case accepted the appeal of Peru and accordingly stated that the mark of the appellant "Pisco" eligible for registration.

According to an official, Chile has raised opposition on this again.

The official said that now Chile has to approach High Court as IPAB's order can only be challenged in a High Court.
Award of GI tag gives protection to a producer of those genuine products, which commands premium pricing in the domestic and international markets.

Once GI protection is granted, no other producer can misuse the name to market similar products. It also provides comfort to customers about the authenticity of that product.

The tag is initially granted for a period of ten years but can be renewed indefinitely.


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