Indian non-profit challenges new content regulation rules for news media

The case will next be heard on April 16

NEW DELHI (Reuters) - An Indian non-profit which runs an independent news website on Tuesday challenged in court the country's new rules that seek to regulate content on digital news media.

The so-called Intermediary Guidelines and Digital Media Ethics Code was announced by New Delhi last month and is legally enforceable.

It also regulates big social media firms such as Facebook and Twitter.

In its petition in the Delhi High Court, the Foundation for Independent Journalism, which publishes 'The Wire' news portal, argued the rules formulated under India's Information Technology Act should not govern online news media.

The rules lay a three-tier regulatory structure for news media including an oversight mechanism by the federal government, sparking concerns that it will curb the freedom of press to report independently.

The case will next be heard on April 16.

 

(Reporting by Sankalp Phartiyal; Editing by Lincoln Feast.)


(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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