Madhya Pradesh govt sets rates for hospitals treating Covid-19 patients

It was decided that patients can voluntarily pay bills, fully or partially, at designated hospitals which are treating free of cost at the moment.

The Madhya Pradesh government on

Saturday decided that private hospitals treating COVID-19 patients could charge only 40 per cent more than rates prevalent in the time before the outbreak.

It was also decided that patients being treated at private COVID-19 designated hospitals, which are authorised and in contract with the government, can voluntarily pay their bills.

Such hospitals are currently treating patients free of cost.

After a meeting chaired by Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan to review the coronavirus situation, Minister for Medical Education Minister Vishvas Sarang informed that there was some confusion about bills being raised by private hospitals treating COVID-19 patients.

"It was decided in the meeting that private hospitals treating COVID-19 patients can charge bills on the basis of rates fixed before February this year. They can charge maximum 40 per cent more than the pre-February rates. Say, they were charging Rs 100 in February, then they can charge Rs 140 now," he said.

It was decided that patients can voluntarily pay bills, fully or partially, at designated hospitals which are treating free of cost at the moment.

A target has been set that 3600 oxygen beds and 564 ICU beds would be added for coronavirus treatment till October 31, which will increases such beds to 11,710 and 2,488 respectively, he said.

Sarang said upto 40 per cent of patients, especially those who are asymptomatic, have been kept in home isolation.

The minister further said command control centres, with ambulance and doctor round the clock, were being set up in every district to monitor the health of those in home isolation.

It was also decided that samples of COVID-19 tests will not be collected from homes now on, and people will have to visit fever clinics for such tests, he added.


(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.

We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

Business Standard is now on Telegram.
For insightful reports and views on business, markets, politics and other issues, subscribe to our official Telegram channel