None can interfere if adult marries as per her choice, convert: Calcutta HC

Representative image

Hearing a petition by a father

claiming that his daughter has been unduly influenced to marry a man of a different religion, the Calcutta High Court has observed that there can be no interference if an adult marries as per her choice and decides to convert.

After a 19-year old woman married a person of her choice, her father petitioned the high court, complaining that his daughter's statement before a magistrate may not have been recorded in an atmosphere where she felt comfortable.

On an FIR filed by the father, the police had produced the woman before a judicial magistrate, before whom she made a statement that she had married of her own will.

"If an adult marries as per her choice and decides to convert and not return to her paternal house, there can be no interference in the matter," a division bench comprising justices Sanjib Banerjee and Arijit Banerjee observed on Monday.

Upon the father's complaint, the high court had directed that the woman would meet the senior-most additional district judge in Tehatta and that sufficient care was to be taken so that she was not under any coercion or undue influence.

The bench noted that despite a clear and clean report being furnished by the additional district judge, the father harbours some suspicion.

Susmita Saha Dutta, the lawyer representing the father, claimed before the division bench that the husband was present within the court premises at Tehatta in Nadia district when the woman appeared before the judge.

The bench directed that to allay the fathers suspicion, the woman will meet additional public prosecutor Saibal Bapuli in his chamber in Kolkata on December 23.

The bench further directed that at the time the woman meets Bapuli, who is representing the state in the matter, there should be no one else in the room, including her husband.

It directed Bapuli to file a short report when the matter appears for hearing again on December 24.


(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.

We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

Business Standard is now on Telegram.
For insightful reports and views on business, markets, politics and other issues, subscribe to our official Telegram channel