Pakistan rejects India's move to appoint interlocutor for J&K dialogue

New Delhi: Dineshwar Sharma, former Director of Intelligence Bureau, calling on the Union Home Minister, Rajnath Singh, after being appointed as the Representative of Government of India to initiate dialogue in Jammu and Kashmir. Photo: PTI
Pakistan on  dismissed as unrealistic India's move to appoint an interlocutor to understand the legitimate aspirations of people in Jammu and Kashmir, saying no interaction or dialogue would carry any weight without the participation of the Hurriyat Conference.

India on Monday appointed former Intelligence Bureau chief Dineshwar Sharma as its special representative for a "sustained dialogue" with all stakeholders in Jammu and Kashmir, in a fresh move aimed at bringing peace to the troubled state.

Responding to a question on Sharma's appointment, Pakistan Foreign Office Spokesperson Nafees Zakaria said that the measure did not appear to be sincere and realistic.

He said that, if anything, the Indian Government's announcement illustrated a recognition -- once again -- of the futility of the use of force and of the indispensability of dialogue.

"However, for any dialogue process to be meaningful and result-oriented, it has to include the three main parties India, Pakistan, and the Kashmiris. In that context, without the participation of the Hurriyat leadership, no interaction or dialogue would carry any weight or meaning," he said.

The spokesperson said that the designated interlocutor had been entrusted with the task of understanding the "legitimate aspirations" of the Kashmiri people.

He said that the need of the hour was to have dialogue for peacefully resolving the Jammu and Kashmir dispute in accordance with the UN Security Council Resolutions and the wishes of the Kashmiri people.

"This was imperative for ensuring durable and sustainable peace and stability in South Asia. Pakistan hoped that the international community would play its rightful role in facilitating such an outcome," he said.

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