Supply chain challenges led to target cut for Covid vaccine doses: Pfizer

Representative photo of a vaccine

By Carl O'Donnell

(Reuters) - Challenges in Pfizer Inc's supply chain for the raw materials used in its COVID-19 vaccine played a role in its decision to slash its 2020 production target, a Pfizer spokeswoman told Reuters.

Pfizer has said in recent weeks that it anticipates producing 50 million doses of its COVID-19 vaccine this year. That is down from an earlier target of 100 million doses. Pfizer's vaccine relies on a two dose regimen, meaning 50 million doses is enough to inoculate 25 million people.

A company spokeswoman said the "scale-up of the raw material supply chain took longer than expected." She also cited later-than-expected results from Pfizer's clinical trial as a reason for the smaller number of doses expected to be produced by the end of 2020.

The spokeswoman added that the modifications to Pfizer's production lines are now complete and finished doses are being made at a rapid pace.

The Wall Street Journal was the first to report the news. It reported that an unnamed person directly involved in the development of the Pfizer vaccine said "some early batches of the raw materials failed to meet the standards," which caused production delays.

Pfizer applied in November for emergency authorization for its COVID-19 vaccine from U.S. regulators. U.S. officials said they expect its vaccine to get regulatory clearance this month. The U.S. government expects its first allocation of the vaccine to include 6.4 million doses, with more to follow.

Regulators in the U.K. have already authorized Pfizer's vaccine for use in that country.

 

 

(Reporting by Carl O'Donnell; Editing by David Gregorio and Stephen Coates)


(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.

We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

Business Standard is now on Telegram.
For insightful reports and views on business, markets, politics and other issues, subscribe to our official Telegram channel