US says deeply saddened by photojournalist Danish Siddiqui's demise

Danish Siddiqui, Photojournalist

The US has said it is 'deeply saddened' by the death of Indian photojournalist Danish Siddiqui during clashes between Afghan forces and Taliban in Kandahar, and called for an end to the violence in Afghanistan.

Taking to Twitter, US State Department spokesperson Ned Price argued that a political settlement is the only way forward to end the current political crisis in Afghanistan.

"Deeply saddened by the death of Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalist Danish Siddiqui today. We call for an end to the violence in Afghanistan, which has claimed far too many lives, including the lives of many journalists. A political settlement is the only way forward," he tweeted.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Siddiqui was killed while covering a clash between Afghan security forces and Taliban, according to news agency Reuters where he was Chief Photographer.

In a tweet, United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) said the killing of the journalist was a painful reminder of mounting dangers faced by media in Afghanistan.

"Media working in Afghanistan and journalism itself in the country is under increasing threat. Our deep condolences to the family & friends of @dansiddiqi. A painful reminder of mounting dangers faced by media in Afghanistan. Authorities must investigate this and all killing of reporters," the UNAMA tweeted.

TOLO News reported that Siddiqui was killed in Kandahar's Spin Boldak district, which has been captured by Taliban.

Afghanistan President Ashraf Ghani on Friday expressed grief over the demise of Indian photojournalist Siddiqui.

"I am deeply saddened with the shocking reports that Reuters Photojournalist Danish Siddiqui was killed while covering the Taliban atrocities in Kandahar," he said.

"While I extend my heartfelt condolences to Sidiqqui's family and also to our media family, I reiterate my government's unwavering commitment to freedom of speech and protection of free media and journalists," he asserted.


(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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