America is back at the table, says Joe Biden as G7 summit concludes

Joe Biden, Queen Elizabeth II meet at Windsor Castle after the end of the G7 summit
President Joe Biden on Sunday said the United States had restored its presence on the world stage and that the US is ‘back at the table’ as he used his first overseas trip since taking office to connect with a new generation of leaders from some of the world's most powerful countries and more closely unite allies on addressing the coronavirus pandemic and China's trade and labour practices. As he wrapped three days of what he called “an extraordinarily collaborative and productive meeting” at the Group of Seven summit of wealthy democracies, Biden said there was “genuine enthusiasm” for his engagement.

“America's back in the business of leading the world alongside nations who share our most deeply held values,” Biden said at a news conference before leaving Cornwall to visit Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle. “I think we've made progress in reestablishing American credibility among our closest friends.” The president, who is on an eight-day, three country trip, left his mark on the G-7 by announcing a commitment to share 500 million coronavirus vaccine doses with the world and pressing allies to do the same. The leaders on Sunday confirmed their intent to donate more than 1 billion doses to low-income countries in the next year.


“This is going to be a constant project for a long time,” Biden said of the global vaccination campaign, adding that he hoped the world could stamp out the pandemic in 2022 or 2023. “It’s not just the right thing to do” from a moral standpoint, Biden said, but also the correct thing to do “in terms of our own health." He also said the US might be able to donate an additional 1 billion vaccine doses to the world in the coming years. He again called for a probe to find whether the virus leaked from a Chinese lab. 

Biden also fought for the leaders' joint statement to include specific language criticizing China's use of forced labor and other human rights abuses as he worked to cast the rivalry with Beijing as the defining competition for the 21st century. The president declined to discuss the private negotiations over the provision, but said he was “satisfied” with the tough rhetoric, though difference remained among the allies about how forcefully to call out Beijing. The leaders also embraced Biden's call for a 15 per cent global minimum corporate tax rate. The other G-7 allies did their part in creating the impression that Biden was part of “the Club” and sought to help reinforce Biden's “America is back” mantra.



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