Jeff Bezos plans to fly on Blue Origin's first human spaceflight

Jeff Bezos. Photo: Bloomberg
Jeff Bezos will go to space next month when his company, Blue Origin, launches its first passenger-carrying mission.

 

The 57-year-old, who plans to travel alongside his brother, Mark, made the announcement in an Instagram post Monday. The scheduled launch next month will be about two weeks after the billionaire plans to step down as chief executive officer of Amazon.com.

 

“Ever since I was five years old, I’ve dreamed of travelling to space,” Bezos said in the post. “On July 20th, I will take that journey with my brother. The greatest adventure, with my best friend.”

 

Blue Origin is one of several high-profile space-tourism companies backed by a wealthy entrepreneur, alongside Elon Musk’s Space Exploration Technologies and Richard Branson-backed Virgin Galactic Holdings. Both companies are making plans to carry paying customers.

 

Blue Origin is auctioning off a seat on its New Shepard rocket for the July 20 flight, an 11-minute trip to suborbital space that will reach an altitude of about 100 km. The spot will be the only one available for purchase on the flight, and the proceeds will go to a Blue Origin foundation promoting math and science education.

 

The high bid stood at $2.8 million on Monday morning, according to the firms’s website. Bidding will end June 12 with a live online auction. It will be Blue Origin’s 16th flight.

 

The company has said that customers will have a four-day experience, including three days of preflight training at the company’s launch site near Van Horn, Texas. Blue Origin has built accommodations, including a cafeteria.

 

Branson, 70, plans to fly on a Virgin Galactic flight to suborbital space, perhaps as early as this summer. The timing of that launch had been in doubt after several test failures and got back on track last month with a successful flight to space carrying two pilots.

 

John Glenn was the oldest person to fly in space, at 77, when he hitched a ride aboard a space shuttle as a US senator in 1998. Glenn had been the first American to orbit the earth, as a National Aeronautics and Space Administration astronaut in 1962.           



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