There's lack of unity in film fraternity: Farhan Akhtar on 'Padmavati', IFFI row

"Unfortunately, we also have to blame ourselves. We should not just be pointing fingers," said Bollywood star Farhan Akhtar while addressing the controversy surrounding 'Padmavati' and retraction of two regional movies from IFFI.

Apart from Marathi film 'Nude' and Malayalam movie 'S Durga' being dropped by the centre from the International Film Festival of India (IFFI), Sanjay Leela Bhansali's magnum-opus has still been facing protests from certain sections.

The 43-year-old, while speaking on the sidelines of a book launch event, addressed these issues and stressed upon the lack of unity in the film fraternity.

"Everyone gets scared when it's there film on the line. It is a small industry... There are not that many people. If they don't come together to create an environment where they themselves can function in, the way they want to, nobody else is going to do it for them," he said.

The 'Dil Dhadakne Do' star further said that audiences should not be treated as children.

"This is not just about those two films or just about 'Padmavati'. This has happened in the past with many films. I am totally against anything being banned. I genuinely believe we should stop treating our audiences as children. We should allow them to grow."

"We should allow them to be exposed to different kinds of ideas to counter cultures, to counter thinking. It's very important for the development of any nation that there are viewpoints which are not always in agreement with the majority."

The actor-director strongly opposed any kind of threat or violence.

"In cinema there's no such law that if a film is made you have to go and see it! You have the freedom to boycott the film. You can tell people to boycott the film. But you don't have the freedom to threaten somebody with grievous bodily harm or break somebody's theatre or cause damage in any way," he concluded.


(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.

We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

Business Standard is now on Telegram.
For insightful reports and views on business, markets, politics and other issues, subscribe to our official Telegram channel