Does your dental floss contain toxic chemicals?

Using Oral-B Glide dental floss could contribute to elevated levels of toxic chemicals that can lead to health problems, especially in women, including kidney and testicular cancer, high cholesterol, low birth weight, among others, says a study led by US-based Silent Spring Institute.

In the study, the team measured the presence of 11 different PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) -- water- and grease-proof substances -- in blood samples of 178 middle-aged women.

The findings, appearing in the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology (JESEE), showed that women who flossed with Oral-B Glide tended to have higher levels of a type of PFAS called PFHxS (perfluorohexanesulfonic acid) in their body compared with those who did not.

"This is the first study to show that using dental floss containing PFAS is associated with a higher body burden of these toxic chemicals," said lead author Katie Boronow, a scientist at the institute.

"The good news is, based on our findings, consumers can choose flosses that don't contain PFAS," she added.

Further, the team also tested 18 dental flosses (including three Glide products) for the presence of fluorine -- a marker of PFAS, all of which tested positive for fluorine. The new findings are consistent with previous reports that Glide is manufactured using Teflon-like compounds.

In addition, the study also showed that women who frequently ate prepared food in coated cardboard containers, such as French fries or takeout, had elevated blood levels of PFAS chemicals.

"Overall, this study strengthens the evidence that consumer products are an important source of PFAS exposure," Boronow said. "Restricting these chemicals from products should be a priority to reduce levels in people's bodies."

Other behaviours that were associated with higher PFAS levels included having stain-resistant carpet or furniture and living in a city served by a PFAS-contaminated drinking water supply.

--IANS

rt/mag/bg


(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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