Sri Lanka bans drones, unmanned aircraft after bombings

Sri Lanka has banned the use of drones and unmanned aircraft following the massive Easter Sunday bombings that killed over 350 people and injured more than 500 in the country's worst terror attack.

The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) said that the ban will be in effect until further notice.

The use of drones and unmanned aircraft has been temporarily banned within the Sri Lankan airspace, Colombo Gazette reported.

The CAA said that it was taking the measure "in view of the existing security situation in the country."

Meanwhile, authorities continued their search operations with the help of army and arrested many suspects overnight.

So far, over 75 people have been arrested in connection with the country's deadliest attack.

Nine suicide bombers, believed to be the members of a local Islamist extremist group National Thowheed Jamath (NTJ), carried out a series of devastating blasts that tore through three churches and three luxury hotels.

As many as 359 people have been killed in the attacks while 500 others injured, according to authorities.

Many of the arrested people have suspected links to the NTJ, the group blamed for the bombings. However, the NTJ has not claimed responsibility for the attacks.

The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attacks and identified suicide bombers who carried out the devastating blasts.

Authorities have deployed thousands of troops to help police carry out search operations.

On Wednesday, the Sri Lankan government admitted that "major" intelligence lapses led to the horrific coordinated attacks.


(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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