White House promises crack down as anger over leaks grows

Washington: Attorney General Jeff Sessions, accompanied by, from left, National Counterintelligence and Security Center Director William Evanina, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Photo: AP
The White House's anger about leaks is growing, and the Trump administration is stepping up efforts to crack down on them.

The attorney general and the national intelligence director are set on Friday to discuss what the Justice Department calls "leaks of classified material threatening national security".

A presidential adviser is raising the possibility of lie detector tests for the small number of people in the West Wing and elsewhere with access to transcripts of President Donald Trump's phone calls.

The Washington Post has published transcripts of his conversations with the leaders of Mexico and Australia. Trump counsellor Kellyanne Conway tells Fox & Friends that "it's easier to figure out who's leaking than the leakers may realize."

And might lie detectors be used? She says: "Well, they may, they may not."

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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