Australia, New Zealand win joint bid to host 2023 Fifa Women's World Cup

A third candidate, Japan, withdrew on Monday. That gave fellow Asian Football Confederation member Australia a clearer run. New Zealand is part of the smaller Oceania continental group. Photo: @NZ_Football

Australia and New Zealand will co-host the 2023 Women's World Cup.

The island neighbours beat Colombia 22-13 on Thursday in a vote by the Fifa Council.

The expanded 32-team tournament eight more than the 2019 edition in France is expected to open in July 2023.

The winning bid proposed 12 cities with seven in Australia and five in New Zealand. It includes the main stadium used for the 2000 Sydney Olympics.

After a successful World Cup last year, Fifa wants the next women's tournament to further establish its independence from the men, and show it is commercially attractive.

 

Congratulations @FFA & @NZ_Football!

YOU will host the #FifaWWC 2023.

Felicitaciones, @FFA y @NZ_Football!

Serán ANFITRIONAS de la #FifaWWC 2023. pic.twitter.com/PaL1PR6HyO

— Fifa Women's World Cup (@FifaWWC) June 25, 2020
At least $100 million is expected to be paid by the governing body in 2023 for prize money, team preparation costs and to clubs releasing players for the tournament Fifa president Gianni Infantino pledged last year in France.

Colombia's bid was rated a high-risk commercial option in an evaluation of the candidates published this month. Australia and New Zealand's bid was rated low-risk and scored 4.1 points out of a maximum 5. Colombia scored 2.8.

A third candidate, Japan, withdrew on Monday. That gave fellow Asian Football Confederation member Australia a clearer run. New Zealand is part of the smaller Oceania continental group.

 

Bring on 2023 

Australian football is on the march...


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