Google Maps improves discoverability in several Indian languages

Google Maps | Representational image

Google Maps on Wednesday said it has incorporated an ensemble of learning models that automatically transliterate the names of points of interest (POIs) to 10 prominent local languages, making it easier for Indian language users find the things they look for at Maps.

This new feature will enable millions to issue queries in their own language and find information on Maps such as restaurants, petrol pumps, hospitals, grocery stores, banks, bus stops, train stations, and numerous other services, Google said.

By using automatic transliteration from the Latin script (English) name of a points of interest, Maps now displays their names in Hindi, Bengali, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Gujarati, Kannada, Malayalam, Punjabi, and Odia.

"To make Google Maps as helpful as possible for millions of Indian language users, we've introduced an updated automatic transliteration system that enables us to deliver more accurate results when users search for POIs in their preferred language," Cibu Johny, Software Engineer, Google Maps, said in a statement.

"In a country where names of establishments are written with words from multiple languages and acronyms, phonetically mapping these words into their native language will help us more accurately surface the results that local language users are looking for."

Explaining how the feature works, he added, "Common English words are frequently used in names of places in India, even when written in the native script. How the name is written in these scripts is largely driven by its pronunciation.

For example, NIT written in Hindi is pronounced "en-aye-tee", not as the English word "nit".

Therefore by understanding that NIT is a common acronym from the region, Maps can derive the correct transliteration.

In the past when Maps could not understand the context of NIT when written in Hindi, it would instead show a related entity that might be farther away from the user.

It is important to note that the transliterated POI names are not translations. Transliteration is only concerned with writing the same words in a different script.

--IANS

gb/sdr/


(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.

We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

Business Standard is now on Telegram.
For insightful reports and views on business, markets, politics and other issues, subscribe to our official Telegram channel